It’s hard to believe, but over the last year, Cullah has created three music videos as well as producing yet another album. His natural intensity is reflected in this video, his newest accomplishment. Never a stranger to pushing the needle forward, he teamed up with local Milwaukee talent to create a flowing effortless portrayal of rhythmic development of romance.

It’s hard to believe, but over the last year, Cullah has created three music videos as well as producing yet another album. His natural intensity is reflected in this video, his newest accomplishment. Never a stranger to pushing the needle forward, he teamed up with local Milwaukee talent to create a flowing effortless portrayal of the rhythmic development of romance. Marina Dove, Dan Wein, and Cullah began working together they spoke over their plates of summer squash and lemonade homemade in Cullah’s childhood home. As they reworked section after section of the vibrant new world of “I Don’t Mind It” the message aged and maturated. According to Cullah, “I create my music to balance between my own individual expression and the forms in which others can digest them” He uses this approach as he salts the taste buds of our ocular and visual palates.

An aesthetic taste to sate appetites of all inclinations. Gliding across the screen, the natural and organic process of falling in love is absorbed. This pattern ingestion is not only the narrative of the music video but also of the viewer’s experience as they view the oftentimes psychedelic movement of Cullah’s music video. Even the choreography of the experience defied the expectations that society separates itself, and throughout the three minutes and thirty seconds, elevates it to high-brow. The three fates border Marina and Cullah as pervasively as society expects us to follow the rules and “natural progression” of love.

Ignoring the fates surrounded by the color blocks of red hotel stairs and cutting contrast of black costume and white. He believes that “Art is the most intense expression of individualism. A true artist believes in himself. A true artist must understand the society that they are formed by.” His struggle to maintain his freedom is clear in the dizzying melting patterns with brass saxophone. What, after all, separates an individual’s wants from the wants of their culture? The main character’s willful cold shoulder to the external elements that shape his art create a destructive paradox. In ignoring his culture, he is, at the same time subject to it. This excitement of love and staying in love that, in the end, resulted in the corrosion of his own artistic vision. Although, crossing the skyline of Milwaukee, it doesn’t seem that he minds following society’s expectations.

Again and again, Cullah goes above and beyond, not only through the stellar production work, but a masterful command of narrative. His methods are devoted to balance and a drive to deliver excellence of product and taste to truth. Heart and the ever-undulating pressures of society on the artistic mind are the central themes of Cullah’s newest production.